To My Friends in Kansas City (Yes, Lawrence too)

In the two years since I was diagnosed with stage IV melanoma, my healing journey has been spurred on by the love and support extended from family, friends and even strangers around the world, particularly in the Kansas City area. As a way to express gratitude, I will be hosting a seminar in Kansas City to share my journey beginning with the diagnosis and discussing the nutritional protocols used to heal and how others can rebuild health and prevent disease.

The event will take place Saturday, October 11th from 9:30 to 11:30 in the morning.  Westside Family Church (8500 Woodsonia Dr. Lenexa, KS 66227) has graciously allowed us use of their facilities and childcare will be available. There will not be a cost for the event, however, if you’d like to bring a donation to help cover expenses we would be grateful.

·         Please use the link below to register for the event by Monday October 6th so we are able to plan accordingly.

·         To provide an accurate count, please sign up each attendee individually.

·         Leave a comment if you will take advantage of the childcare, how many children and their ages.

This event is open to anyone who has interest, so please feel free to forward this invitation.

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0844a4a72ca6fe3-healed

 

Healed by Design - KC


The Peloton Part 2: A Brief Follow-up to a Previous Post

I received numerous questions about a previous post titled The Peloton. Here I try to answer them.

 

Lynn greeted me at the Kansas City airport on a Friday afternoon in early June and eagerly relayed the plans for the following day’s kick-off to the “Vision Tour”. There would be twenty-five serious cyclists in the peloton. This was a collection of men serious about their bicycles. For them, a one-hundred-twenty mile excursion seemed like a delightful way to spend a Saturday. Then there was me. My love for and desire to support my friend compelled me to endure the soreness and inevitable chaffing that would follow. I was glad to learn that I had been assigned the task of driving the “sag-wagon” (a support truck for anyone who found themselves in distress) and would join the pack for the final fifteen miles into Manhattan.

The details, as Lynn laid them out, had been carefully arranged, but there was one aspect outside the realm of careful planning that could make or break the trek: weather.

A meteorologist friend had kept a vigil on the climate in the week leading up to the event. An early prediction of a beautiful sunny morning soon gave way to an ominous storm front bearing a torrential downpour. Cyclists are a dedicated bunch known to willingly endure tremendous physical suffering as they charge up the side of mountains or ceaselessly pedal into a fierce wind coming across the plains of Kansas. They are not, however, crazy. When weather conditions promise lightning and flooding, plans get rescheduled. By five-thirty Friday evening Lynn made the decision to delay the launch of the tour to Sunday.

For me that meant a number of things. First, my return flight to Dallas was Sunday afternoon so I could no longer participate in the experience. Second, I was able to sleep in without kids jumping into my rib cage asking me to make pancakes. Third, the delay allowed Lynn and me to spend a wonderful Saturday afternoon together. Lastly, my entire Sunday wasn’t a loss as I was able to play a quick nine holes of golf with my brother-in-law before being dropped off at the airport.

The peloton was somewhere between Lawrence and Topeka by the time I stood on the first tee box and sliced my golf ball into a lake. What was impressive, however, is that of all those who volunteered for the ride the only person who couldn’t make it because of the rain delay was me. When their friend was in need they made room in their schedule to be flexible and showed up.

My flight back to Dallas allowed me the opportunity to think about the incredible number of people who are in my family’s peloton and showed up when we were most in need. We are all eternally grateful for everyone who carved time in their schedule to send cards, emails, Facebook messages, phone calls, care packages for the boys, run errands or travel to Dallas for a visit. We treasure the encouragement and continue to love hearing from you as we “ride on.”

 

The rain delay scratched both the bike ride and the basketball game. But I stand ready...

The rain delay scratched both the bike ride and the basketball game. But I stand ready…


15 Year Anniversary

On July 31st, 1999 two very young college students married in a church in Andover, Kansas. and celebrated into the night with family and friends. Tonight this couple has modest plans to mark the passing of fifteen years of marriage. There will be dinner at their favorite raw food restaurant, then, an early bedtime because tomorrow is a work day and they need their sleep.

 

I recently asked Teri her thoughts about the past fifteen years and she summarized it simply stating, “I have a lot of carrot juice invested in this marriage.”

 

Happy Anniversary, my love. What a ride.

 

Before…

I think I can still fit into my tuxedo!

I think I can still fit into my tuxedo!

After…

Teri and I today

Teri and I today


The Peloton

My usual breakfast fare doesn’t normally include a hotel buffet line three miles from my house but when my friend Lynn is visiting Dallas and there is only a mere hour to spend together before the demands of work drag us back to our respective careers, I will make do with whatever is on the menu. This meal was the first opportunity for us to talk since his wife passed away a few months prior. Small talk isn’t his style so the conversation dove deep and the tears flowed. We are each, it turns out, suffering through a loss. He was grieving his spouse while I mourned the loss of my health and the planned future for my family. We comfort each other over bowls of tepid oatmeal and discussed the need to re-imagine life, one forged in the fire of this suffering.

“Bruce,” he said and a grin spread across his face, “I’ve got something in the works. Something, I think, that is going to be big,”

Lynn is a dreamer, always looking at the big picture. I was instantly intrigued by his proclamation. “Alright. Lay it on me.”

“I’m planning a bike ride to cast a new vision for my life.”

“Okay. Where are you going to ride?”

“The ‘vision tour’ will start in Kansas City and end eight-hundred miles later in Crested Butte.”

“It’s your personal Tour de France, but with fewer mountains and no yellow jersey at the end.”

“Yes, and I want you to join me.”

“Uh, what?”

“In cycling there is a big group of riders that in tight formation who work together and become more aerodynamic, can ride faster and farther while expending less energy.”

“Yeah, sure, the peloton.”

“Exactly. Come be part of my peloton.”

“Man, I don’t know if I could ride eight miles right now, let alone eight-hundred.”

“Not whole way, just for a day. Ride the first leg from Kansas City to Manhattan.”

“How far is that?”

“One-hundred-twenty miles.”

“Lynn, God didn’t build these skinny legs for endurance sports. I’ve tried and the result wasn’t pretty.”

“How about this, you could meet us along the way and ride the final fifteen or twenty miles into Manhattan.”

“I might be able to survive twenty miles, but I haven’t touched a bike in two years. I don’t even own a bike anymore, it was stolen out of my garage.”

“I’ll find a bike for you to use. Think about it.”

Lynn isn’t crazy, he’s a cyclist, and cyclists are fanatical when it comes to their sport. They have their own social clubs, language, clothing lines and, for many, their own rules of the road. They push their bodies to endure through the sweltering heat, bitter cold, driving rain and thrashing winds then celebrate the suffering while sharing hard earned pints of beer. It’s a fantastic world of camaraderie and friendship for those who find pleasure in the sensation of leg muscles burning in protest as the mind forces the body to peddle one more mile and to summit one more steep hill. For men like Lynn, who have a garage bursting with bicycles, are known by name at the bike shop and talk intelligently about pelotons, panniers and sag wagons, hours spent “in the saddle” are better than therapy.

Lynn’s “vision tour” across the Amber Waves of Kansas and into the Rocky Mountains made sense because he understands that life’s most difficult moments, the one’s that disrupt the routine of life and destroys best laid plans, whether caused by the death of a spouse or a terminal cancer diagnosis, are opportunities to reinvent yourself and experience God in new ways.

Not every person, however, plans a grueling bike ride to cast a vision for their life, but the process of re-purposing is a vital part of the healing process. There comes a time when it is necessary to face the suffering head on and forge through the jungle of emotions and uncertainty in order to understand how these experiences will impact the future.

I began re-envisioning my life the moment, twenty-one months ago, the doctor’s words, “The test was positive for cancer,” filled the silent hospital room. The re-imagining process is slow and tedious and there isn’t a single aspect of life that escapes the examination. Parts of life that seemed mundane were put under a microscope and scrutinized anew.

When I walked through the front door of my house after two weeks in the hospital it felt as though I was entering for the first time. Through the filter of a terminal cancer diagnosis the furniture, tile floors, ceiling fans and even the grass in the back yard felt new, as if I had never been in that house. My children greeted me with tender hugs and I wrapped my arms tightly around them, kissed them and savored the scent of their hair. The joy of that aroma was immense and I wept.

“Why are you crying, daddy?”

“I’m so happy to be home and see you again.”

“I’m glad you’re home too.”

At that simple act of a hug from my sons ceased to be a mechanical process of bending elbows, pressing flesh and a quick squeeze. Each hug from that day since serves to re-iterate the motivation for the hard work and sacrifice my wife and I put into nutritional therapies that are repairing my immune system so it can rid my body of cancer.

Scrutinizing the present and renewing passion for the future doesn’t happen overnight and requires asking both the big and little questions:

“Am I living for my highest calling?”

“How can I use this new knowledge to help others going through similar experiences?”

“How do I do a better job of managing stress?”

“Will the Kansas State Wildcats compete for the Big 12 title this year?”

“Am I doing enough of the right things to allow my body to heal?”

Following nutritional healing protocols is difficult work that requires complete transformation of habits and thought. Progress is tracked through a number of tests and the results I’ve received indicate healing is well on its way. Additionally, my physical condition, stamina and abilities continue to improve (this past weekend I scored the best nine holes of golf in over five years). These results are a gift from God that give hope on days when I am consumed with fear.

 

Lynn finished his vision ride but didn’t do it alone. There were a peloton of riders with him at nearly every stage along the way who sheltered him from the fierce Kansas winds, motivated him to push through the fatigue, engaged in probing conversations and celebrated when he crossed the finish line.

Like a group of cyclists whose communal efforts allow them to cut through the headwinds, travel faster and encourage each other to power through the fatigue our family continues to be carried along by the support and love of family and friends. Life, like cycling, is best done in a peloton.


Disease Proof Your Body

For anyone in Dallas this weekend who wants to learn ways to “Disease Proof Your Body,” Teri and I are hosting a class at Be Raw Food and Juice this Sunday evening from 5-7pm.

 

Disease Proof Final

 

Click HERE to register for the event.

 


Survive and Advance

Avid college basketball fans anticipate the advent of March like a five-year-old waits in expectation for Christmas. The entire month is filled with compelling match-ups and exciting games but the opening days of the NCAA Tournament truly are the most wonderful time of the year.  For myself and long-time friends Joel and Dave the dawning of the month of March ushers in the continuation of the March Madness Marathon tradition. Joel converts his living room into a tournament shrine where TV’s and food abound, Dave flies in from Florida, and for four glorious days we cheer on the underdogs as they play for an upsets and curse the teams who ruin our predictions. As I write this Joel and Dave are updating their brackets based on the latest game’s outcome and I’m sipping on a glass of carrot juice. 

Despite my cancer diagnosis the tradition carries on. The weekend does, however, look quite a bit different for me than in years past. There are no days off when working to heal the body with nutrition. When a person’s life is on the line, each day of survival is an upset.  The nutritional cancer protocols don’t take a vacation just because I’m enjoying a few days with college friends. In fact, being out of my normal routine requires serious preparation in order to keep going. Watching basketball, these days is a lot of work. Here is a list of things this plant-based cancer survivor needs for a weekend of basketball watching (in alphabetical order):

  • Almond Milk
  • Apples
  • Avocados
  • Barely Grass
  • Beets
  • Blueberries
  • Braggs Aminos
  • Carrots
  • Carrots
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Clothes
  • Cottage Cheese
  • Cucumbers
  • Flax Seed Oil
  • Hummus
  • Juicer
  • Kale
  • Lemons
  • Limes
  • Mason Jars
  • Nutritional Yeast
  • Parsley
  • Raspberries
  • Red Cabbage
  • Sea Salt
  • Shaker Bottle
  • Shampoo
  • Soap
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
  • Swimsuit
  • The Zip
  • Walnuts
  • Wheatgrass
  • Winning Tournament Bracket

 

It has been seventeen months since I sat in an oncologist’s office and was told I wouldn’t survive more than a year. That prognosis casts a dark shadow over last year’s tournament and I wondered if I would live to see another March Madness. A year of survival and thriving health has replaced fear and uncertainty with joy and hope. So I, like teams that win a close game to move onto the next round of the tournament, continue to “survive and advance.”


Raw Health Series

This lifesaving journey I have been traveling these past seventeen months has taken me from sick and on the brink of death to thriving and vibrant. So many friends and family members have shared in this journey and told my story to others that not a single week goes by when I am not peppered with questions about how what people eat can improve wellbeing and ways to incorporate changes into a busy life. Sharing my experiences and knowledge is invigorating and I never tire of engaging in these conversations. This is one of the many reasons I am thrilled to partner with Be Raw Food and Juice in Dallas to deliver the Raw Health Series. These monthly classes will cover a range of wellness related topics, the dramatic ways food affects vitality and how to adopt a plant-powered lifestyle.

Below I’ve posted the flier for this month’s class and a link to register. This is an invitation to anyone interested in attending. Seating is limited so sign up early.

 

Juicing final

Click HERE to register.